CALL TO ORDER NOW
Toll Free 1-877-877-5655
Se habla espaƱol 877-877-5491

Serving Customers with Peanut and Tree Nut Allergies

Serving Customers with Peanut and Tree Nut Allergies

 Peanuts and tree nuts are a common ingredient or garnish for many restaurant dishes, but for some guests, even a trace amount of nut protein can cause an allergic reaction. Peanuts and tree nut allergic reactions tend to be very severe and may be life-threatening. Estimates show that nearly 3.1 million Americans suffer from tree nut allergies,1 and the number of children with peanut allergies doubled between 1997 and 2002.2 So it is important to be aware of the common foods and ingredients that contain nuts in order to assure your guests have a healthy dining experience.

Types of Tree Nuts

The following table contains common tree nuts that are known to cause allergic reactions and should be avoided when preparing dishes:

Almond
Brazil nut
Cashew
Chestnut
Hazelnut/Filbert
Macadamia nut
Pecan
Pine nut
Pistachio
Walnut
 
 
*Information in this table compiled from the Food Allergy Initiative’s Website on Tree Nut Allergies
Common Foods that Contain Tree Nuts

Whether in trace amounts or as a primary ingredient, tree nuts can be found in a variety of common ready-to-eat foods.

Foods that Contain Peanuts
Foods that Contain Tree Nuts
Candy
Cereals
Desserts
Candy
Chili
(used as a thickener)
Marinades
Peanut butter
Ethnic foods
Spaghetti sauce
(used as a thickener)
Salads
Ethnic foods
Crackers
 
Flavored coffee
 
Barbeque sauce
 
Desserts
 
Cookies
 
Frozen desserts
 
Cold cuts
 
Baked goods
*Information in this table compiled from the Food Allergy Initiative’s Website

Ingredients to Avoid

When serving guests with peanut or tree nut allergies, be sure to read food labels for common ingredients that contain contain nut proteins.

Ingreadients with Peanuts
Ingredients with Tree Nuts
Arachis oil
Tree nut oils
Mixed nuts
Wintergreen extract
Beer nuts
Artificial nut flavors
Artificially flavored nuts
Marzipan
Ground nuts
Almond extract
Lupine or lupin
Nougat
Hazelnuts
 
*Information in this table compiled from the Food Allergy Initiative’s Website


1 U.S. Food and Drug Administration, “Program Priorities in the Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition,” http://www.fda.gov/ohrms/dockets/dockets/98n0359/98n-0359-EC384-Attach-1.pdf (accessed October 12, 2008).
2 Food Allergy & Anaphylaxis Network, “Tips for Managing a Peanut Allergy,” http://www.foodallergy.org/allergens/egg.html (accessed October 12, 2008).